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Napoleon

The conflagration of Moscow in 1812 and the fall of the French empire are two facts which cannot be separated, but to the name of Moscow is attached another name, that of Rostopchine. Count Fedor Wassiljavitch Rostopchine is connected with one of the greatest events in universal history. He caused a crisis which decided the fate of Russia and arrested the march of ascending France by giving the death blow to Napoleon. The latter, in admitting that Rostopchine was the author of his ruin, meant him when he said, "one man less, and I would have been master of the world."

Atonia Gastrica, by which term is understood abdominal relaxation and ptosis of viscera, is a subject of vast importance, as has been proved by the avalanche of literature it has caused during the last decade. The relation of some ailments to abdominal relaxation has only been recognized since the author's method of abdominal strapping has been adopted and extensively practiced. This book gives in attractive form all we know in regard to aetiology; it describes and treats on the significance of the plaster strapping as the most rational therapeutic measure.

During the night from October 18th. to October 19th., all soldiers were busy loading vehicles with provisions and baggage. On October 19th., the first day of the retreat, forever memorable on account of the misfortune and heroism which characterized it, the grand army presented a strange spectacle. The soldiers were in a fair condition, the horses lean and exhausted. But, above all, the masses following the army were extraordinary.

BY DR. ACHILLES ROSE, Honorary Member of the Medical Society of Athens. Member of the Committee on Nomenclature of the Medical Society of Athens.

G. E. STECHERT &COMPANY, 151-155 West 25th Street, New York. Price, $1.00.

About a mile and a half from Wiasma the enemy appeared to the left of the road, and his fire happened to strike the midst of the tail of the army, composed of disbanded soldiers without arms, with wounded and sick among them, and women and children. Every artillery discharge of the Russians caused frightful cries and a frightful commotion in the helpless mass.

And the rear guard, in trying to make them advance, ill-treated them, the soldiers who had clung to the flag assumed the right to despise those who, either voluntarily or under compulsion, had abandoned it.

G. E. STECHERT &CO., 151-155 West 25th Street. Price, $1.00.

CONTENTS.

PREFACE. - A Political Retrospect on Greece. - The Hostility of the Great European Powers towards Greece Since the Establishment of the Greek Kingdom. - Pacifico Affair and Lord Palmerston. - Cretan Insurrections. - Latest War. - Greece's Future

CHAPTER I. - An Historical Sketch of Greek. - Relation of the Greek of To-day to the Greek of the Attic Orators. - Exposure of many Erroneous Views which have been Prevailing until Recently

In order to give an idea of the great difficulties the soldiers had to face, and examples of their heroic behavior under trying circumstances, let us relate the disaster of Vop.

His GRACE, ARCHBISHOP CORRIGAN, New York, wrote the day after having received the book: "Dear Doctor, Many thanks for your great courtesy in sending me a copy of your charming work, 'Christian Greece and Living Greek.' I have already begun its perusal, the chapter on the proper 'Pronunciation of Greek' naturally inviting and claiming immediate attention. I think you laugh Erasmus out of court. Now I must begin, if leisure be ever afforded me, to dip into Greek again, to learn to pronounce your noble language correctly.

All the corps marched to Smolensk where they expected to reach the end of all their misery and to find repose, food, shelter; in fact, all they were longing for.

Napoleon entered the city with his guards and kept the rest of the army, including the stragglers, out of doors until arrangements could have been made for the regular distribution of rations and quarters. But together with the stragglers the mass of the army became unmanageable and resorted to violence.

Surgeon Huber of the Wuerttembergians, writes to his friend, Surgeon Henri de Roos, who settled in Russia after the campaign of 1812, how he crossed the Beresina, and in this connection he describes the following dreadful episode:

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