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Greece

Thucydides chosen by the Aristocratic Party to oppose Pericles. - His Policy. - Munificence of Pericles. - Sacred War. - Battle of Coronea. - Revolt of Euboea and Megara. - Invasion and Retreat of the Peloponnesians. - Reduction of Euboea. - Punishment of Histiaea - A Thirty Years' Truce concluded with the Peloponnesians. - Ostracism of Thucydides.

Situation and Soil of Attica. - The Pelasgians its earliest Inhabitants. - Their Race and Language akin to the Grecian. - Their varying Civilization and Architectural Remains. - Cecrops. - Were the earliest Civilizers of Greece foreigners or Greeks? - The Foundation of Athens. - The Improvements attributed to Cecrops. - The Religion of the Greeks cannot be reduced to a simple System. - Its Influence upon their Character and Morals, Arts and Poetry. - The Origin of Slavery and Aristocracy.

The Character and Popularity of Miltiades. - Naval Expedition. - Siege of Paros. - Conduct of Miltiades. - He is Accused and Sentenced. - His Death.

Causes of the Power of Pericles. - Judicial Courts of the dependant Allies transferred to Athens. - Sketch of the Athenian Revenues. - Public Buildings the Work of the People rather than of Pericles. - Vices and Greatness of Athens had the same Sources. - Principle of Payment characterizes the Policy of the Period. - It is the Policy of Civilization. - Colonization, Cleruchia.

The unimportant consequences to be deduced from the admission that Cecrops might be Egyptian. - Attic Kings before Theseus. - The Hellenes. - Their Genealogy. - Ionians and Achaeans Pelasgic. - Contrast between Dorians and Ionians. - Amphictyonic League.

The Athenian Tragedy. - Its Origin. - Thespis. - Phrynichus. - Aeschylus. - Analysis of the Tragedies of Aeschylus.

I. From the melancholy fate of Miltiades, we are now invited to a subject no less connected with this important period in the history of Athens. The interval of repose which followed the battle of Marathon allows us to pause, and notice the intellectual state to which the Athenians had progressed since the tyranny of Pisistratus and his sons.

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