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Canada

France, when she undertook the creation of a Bourbon empire beyond the seas, was the first nation of Europe. Her population was larger than that of Spain, and three times that of England. Her army in the days of Louis Quatorze, numbering nearly a half-million in all ranks, was larger than that of Rome at the height of the imperial power. No nation since the fall of Roman supremacy had possessed such resources for conquering and colonizing new lands.

The closing quarter of the fifteenth century in Europe has usually been regarded by historians as marking the end of the Middle Ages. The era of feudal chaos had drawn to a close and states were being welded together under the leadership of strong dynasties. With this consolidation came the desire for expansion, for acquiring new lands, and for opening up new channels of influence. Spain, Portugal, and England were first in the field of active exploration, searching for stores of precious metals and for new routes to the coasts of Ormuz and of India.

In the closing years of the sixteenth century the spirit of French expansion, which had remained so strangely inactive for nearly three generations, once again began to manifest itself. The Sieur de La Roche, another Breton nobleman, the merchant traders, Pontgrave of St. Malo and Chauvin of Honfleur, came forward one after the other with plans for colonizing the unknown land. Unhappily these plans were not easily matured into stern realities. The ambitious project of La Roche came to grief on the barren sands of Sable Island.

 HURON GRAVES. - PREPARATION FOR THE CEREMONY. - DISINTERMENT. - 
 THE MOURNING. - THE FUNERAL MARCH. - THE GREAT SEPULCHRE. - 
 FUNERAL GAMES. - ENCAMPMENT OF THE MOURNERS. - GIFTS. - HARANGUES. - 
 FRENZY OF THE CROWD. - THE CLOSING SCENE. - ANOTHER RITE. - 
 THE CAPTIVE IROQUOIS. - THE SACRIFICE.

 INDIAN INFATUATION. - IROQUOIS AND HURON. - HURON TRIUMPHS. - 
 THE CAPTIVE IROQUOIS. - HIS FEROCITY AND FORTITUDE. - PARTISAN EXPLOITS. - 
 DIPLOMACY. - THE ANDASTES. - THE HURON EMBASSY. - NEW NEGOTIATIONS. - 
 THE IROQUOIS AMBASSADOR. - HIS SUICIDE. - IROQUOIS HONOR.

 ENTHUSIASM FOR THE MISSION. - SICKNESS OF THE PRIESTS. - 
 THE PEST AMONG THE HURONS. - THE JESUIT ON HIS ROUNDS. - 
 EFFORTS AT CONVERSION. - PRIESTS AND SORCERERS. - THE MAN-DEVIL. - 
 THE MAGICIAN'S PRESCRIPTION. - INDIAN DOCTORS AND PATIENTS. - 
 COVERT BAPTISMS. - SELF-DEVOTION OF THE JESUITS.

 HOPES OF THE MISSION. - CHRISTIAN AND HEATHEN. - BODY AND SOUL. - 
 POSITION OF PROSELYTES. - THE HURON GIRL'S VISIT TO HEAVEN. - A CRISIS. - 
 HURON JUSTICE. - MURDER AND ATONEMENT. - HOPES AND FEARS.

 JEAN DE BREBEUF. - CHARLES GARNIER. - JOSEPH MARIE CHAUMONOT. - 
 NOEL CHABANEL. - ISAAC JOGUES. - OTHER JESUITS. - NATURE OF THEIR FAITH. - 
 SUPERNATURALISM. - VISIONS. - MIRACLES.

 THE CENTRE OF THE MISSIONS. - FORT. - CONVENT. - HOSPITAL. - CARAVANSARY. - 
 CHURCH. - THE INMATES OF SAINTE MARIE. - DOMESTIC ECONOMY. - MISSIONS. - 
 A MEETING OF JESUITS. - THE DEAD MISSIONARY.

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